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Detroit’s Own: Huda Kattan

The beauty mogul celebrates her new skin-care line, Wishful, by removing the layers of makeup that made her famous.

“So you really want to know [what I’ve had done]?” says Huda Kattan through a shy smile. I do—and I’m guessing her 43 million Instagram followers and 3.8 million YouTube subscribers are also curious. Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

We’re sitting in the bathroom of Huda Beauty’s Dubai headquarters, which often doubles as the setting for the videos that launched a thousand cut creases. The 36-year-old entrepreneur takes a deep breath and walks me through all the work it’s taken—both cosmetically and mentally—to transform herself into the makeup innovator, mother, and mononymous beauty icon she is today.

A nose job in 2013. Subtle Botox tweaks in the face and jawline. A breast lift. Fillers in her lips, cheeks, and chin, and under the eyes. Dissolving those fillers because she felt like it was too much. Feng shui consultations. Thread lifts in her jaw and cheeks. Semi-shaved-off brows. Three years working with a life coach. And, most recently, an innovative treatment created by her Dubai-based dermatologist, Marta Duarte, MD, that was inspired by her most critical YouTube followers. “I used to get comments saying, ‘You look like a nutcracker,’ ” Kattan says about the smile lines on either side of her mouth. “My doctor developed a procedure where she goes in with a small needle and actually rips the skin off the muscle piece by piece. It’s very painful.” When she’s in full glam, like today, it’s all topped with the icing on the procedural cake: about two hours of makeup.

Huda Kattan Elle 0420

Kattan in a full face of glam, moments before she removed it all for our shoot. MARGAUX ANBOUBA Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

It’s hard not to balk at this confession. But Kattan’s complete transparency—at a time when many are still hesitant to disclose that they have had even a drop of injectables, let alone cosmetic surgery—is a refreshing part of her brand. “I started bruising [from the treatments],” she says. “And I was like, ‘What do I do? Cover them up? Show them?’ And I was like, ‘Fuck it. I’ll just start showing them.’ It’s important for me to tell people when I’m doing something. And it’s liberating.” This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site. https://www.youtube.com/embed/obLKC0JlgGQ?v=obLKC0JlgGQ&start=0&enablejsapi=1&origin=https://www.elle.com

In addition to her camera, her crew, and my recorder, her bathroom is overrun with serums, makeup products, and skin-care tools—some from her own seven-year-old brand, which was recently valued at $1.2 billion, and some sent to her by brands desperate to appear on her social channels.

“I used to get comments saying, ‘You look like a nutcracker.’”

The child of Iraqi immigrants, Kattan was born in Oklahoma City and eventually moved to Cookeville, Tennessee, with her family. Growing up in the South, Kattan found her name, heritage, and appearance made her feel like an outsider. She spent her formative years trying to find a way to blend in, which included briefly going by the more culturally ambiguous name Heidi. Still feeling insecure, she turned to makeup. “I felt like I wasn’t pretty,” she says. “I saw all these celebrities on television and thought they were so glamorous and beautiful. I thought [makeup] might make me feel a sense of happiness.” Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Kattan’s love affair with cosmetics began at age 14, when she discovered a pinkish-brown Revlon lipstick in her sister Alya’s makeup bag. “It was so beautiful,” she says. “I couldn’t really afford to buy my own, but I always used to borrow it from her.” By the time she was studying finance at the University of Michigan–Dearborn, Kattan was taking every opportunity she could find to do makeup—for friends, for school plays, for basically anyone who needed a (free) makeup artist.

She took a finance job at the Dubai outpost of a consulting firm after graduating, which lasted less than a year before her role at the company was eliminated due to the recession. In a vlog on her website, Kattan admits that finance was “just not the right fit.” It was her other sister, Mona (one of Huda Beauty’s early investors, along with Alya), who suggested she study makeup. With the support of her entire family, Kattan moved to Los Angeles in 2009 to attend the Joe Blasco Makeup Training Center. After completing her coursework, she returned to Dubai and began working as a professional makeup artist. Early clients included Eva Longoria, Nicole Richie, and several members of various Middle Eastern royal families. In 2010, again encouraged by her sisters, she founded the Huda Beauty blog and began sharing tutorials and makeup reviews. This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site. https://www.instagram.com/p/B7VmD85FtrX/embed/captioned/?cr=1&v=12&wp=642&rd=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.elle.com&rp=%2Fbeauty%2Fa31469289%2Fhuda-kattan-beauty-skin-care%2F#%7B%22ci%22%3A0%2C%22os%22%3A18931%2C%22ls%22%3A18407%2C%22le%22%3A18573%7D View this post on Instagram

LOVE you guys soo MUCH!!! I see you guys….the comments, the reposts, & doing my DIY’s!!! THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU for all the love & support for @hudabeautyskin!!! I feel soo loved!!! These cuties tried my DIY pineapple mask @joselaizmakeup @shamilarao @makeupbyiqraa Tag me so I can feature you! REPOST @hudabeautyskin I’m sooo excited to share with you everything I’ve learned over the past decade & a half. Starting with one of my FAV #DIY pineapple enzyme mask 🍍 Instantly smooth and radiating skin in a few minutes (thanks to the Bromelain 🙏) ✨ What DIY do you want me to do next?

A post shared by HUDA KATTAN (@hudabeauty) on Jan 15, 2020 at 2:45am PST Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Her first product launch in 2013—a line of false lashes—caught the eye of Kim Kardashian West. “I was creating my own lashes by using bits and pieces from different brands to make unique lashes that felt good and looked like natural lashes, even if superdramatic,” Kattan says, wearing her signature lengthening lashes, called Hoodie. “Most falsies were just a single strip, which doesn’t emulate a natural lash. It wasn’t until we created our own product that things changed. People became more interested in what we were saying.”

Huda Beauty Pop-Up Launch & Flash Mob

At the launch of the first-ever Huda Beauty pop-up shop in London in November 2019. David M. BenettGetty Images

A full makeup range eventually followed, and by 2017, Kattan was named one of the 25 most influential figures on the internet by Time magazine, and one of the top 10 beauty influencers by Forbes. But something was still holding her back from truly feeling confident: her skin. For years, Kattan had used makeup to mask insecurities about her skin and feeling like an outsider. Now she wanted to put her best face forward—with or without makeup. Despite having an entire roomful of skin-care products, she couldn’t find any that delivered glowy, even results without irritating her imbalanced, sensitive skin. Enter Wishful. “What do you wish for in good skin care?” she says of her new line. “Your wish is our command. We’re going to solve it.” Yo Glow Enzyme Scrub Huda Beauty $39.00 SHOP NOW

The first product, Yo Glow Enzyme Scrub, is an exfoliating whip that you smooth onto dry, clean skin to gently resurface and even skin tone. It’s a combination of soft cellulose pieces (an eco-friendly alternative to micro-beads), alpha and beta hydroxy acids, and a surprise ingredient that inspired the baby-yellow packaging: bromelain. Kattan discovered the anti-inflammatory enzyme while recovering from her nose job. “I had to go straight back to shooting videos,” she says. “I knew bromelain was one of the best things for [reducing] inflammation, so I juiced a pineapple every day. When I took the cast off my nose, it looked like I hadn’t had anything done. I became obsessed.”

It’s an unusual choice to launch an exfoliator as a skin-care line’s sole product. But then again, few could have predicted that a line of false lashes would ultimately spawn a billion-dollar beauty empire. Kattan realizes some may be dubious about entrusting their skin to a makeup artist known for “cake face.” But, she says, her hours of makeup training give her unique insight. “An exfoliator is the one product everybody needs to have. I use this before makeup because it smooths everything out.” By whisking away dead skin cells, the product also helps skin-care ingredients work better. “It’s great for everyone,” she says, “whether you wear tons of makeup or not.”

At the end of our talk, Kattan embarks on the ultimate beauty dare: Staring directly into the camera, she peels off her lashes. Then, using her long, sparkling nails, she scoops out a dollop of Huda Beauty Makeup Remover Balm and gently massages it over her entire face. A few Bioderma-laden cotton pads later and she’s barefaced. “Beauty actually has very little to do with what you see,” she says, as the photographer captures picture after picture of her without a stitch of makeup. “Since I like my skin now, I feel confident and proud. Everybody should feel that way.”

Source: https://www.elle.com/beauty/a31469289/huda-kattan-beauty-skin-care/

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Detroit Prognosis

By Mike D. Whitty, PhD and Futurist

I love Detroit. I believe we are all Detroiters at heart. That is why I call myself Dr. Detroit, for a city which is proud, joyful, and creative.

I am an Optimist. My Gray Panther friend etherl Schwartz said, “Don’t tell me what’s wrong, I already know that. Tell me what’s right, how we can make things better.”

My activism and contact with this beautiful and noble community last year gives me hope for Detroit and the world.

Detroit has soul and great music. Labor and civil rights are important to us. So is family and our love of life.

Detroit’s progressives must remember that our vision is of a loving community where we feel safe and supported. We need less blameology and victimology, more hope for the future and the possible human, to save ourselves is to save the world., inner peace and outer peace, evolving global justice and a politics of love.

Now is the time for us to complete our life legacy. We are creating our future as we think, speak and act. Our visionary hopes for the future require all of us to show respect to each other. To embrace tolerance and decency, unity in diversity. And to continue to build a win-win world. All we need is guts, brains and compassion. We need a good-news network (The Detroit Standard) where our positive visions will create a tipping point in human consciousness, allowing a paradigm shift from the creed of greed to one of peace and justice.

Remember all that you are grateful for. Gratitude will give you more strength and love to live the rest of your life. A little bit of solitude, a whole lot of gratitude and a loving attitude.

  • University of Detroit Mercy professor Mike D. Whitty is currently researching the future of work.
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Detroit Mayor Orders Columbus Statue removed

Detroit mayor orders removal of Christopher Columbus bust

DETROIT – Detroit’s Christopher Columbus bust was removed from its pedestal on Monday as protests against racism and police brutality continue in the city.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan ordered the bust to be removed. It will be placed in storage as the city decides what to do with the monument long-term.

The Columbus bust has been a target of vandalism in the city for years. Columbus monuments around the country have been removed in recent weeks.

In fact, Detroit no longer even celebrates Columbus Day, but instead, Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Speaking at a press conference Monday Duggan said there will be a conversation with the community about the statue.

“When I looked at some of the violence around the country, and in particular you got people with arms gathering around a Columbus statue in Philadelphia arguing with people. I thought we don’t need this. We should have a conversation as a community as to what is an appropriate place for such a statue,” said Duggan.

He also talked about the name of the city’s convention center being changed due to race related issues.

Duggan pushed very hard to change the convention center’s name. It was previously named Cobo Hall after former Detroit Mayor, Albert Cobo, who was known as a racist for policies he put in place. The convention center was renamed TCF Center in 2019.

“I just didn’t think our convention center a national symbol of the city should be named after someone who really did a lot to make the lives of African Americans worse in the city of Detroit,” he said.

Statues and monuments have long been a controversial topic in the U.S., especially Confederate monuments in the South. In recent weeks, protests against racism have resulted in the toppling or removal of several monuments around the world.

In Bristol, England, demonstrators toppled a statue of 17th-century slave trader Edward Colston and threw it in the harbor. City authorities said it will be put in a museum.https://de1eee65df7540f2e66606f2b5e04ea9.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

The New Zealand city of Hamilton removed a bronze statue of the British naval officer for whom it is named — a man who is accused of killing indigenous Maori people in the 1860s.

In the U.S., the May 25 death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee to his neck, has led to an all-out effort to remove symbols of the Confederacy and slavery. Several statues of Confederate army leaders have been removed or vandalized, including that of Confederate President Jefferson Davis and Gen. Robert E. Lee. Around the world, historical figures are being re-examined.

So what did Columbus really do? He wasn’t the first to discover the New World, the term generally used to refer to the modern-day Americas. Indigenous people had been living there for centuries by the time Columbus arrived in 1492.

He wasn’t the first European in the New World, either. Leif Eriksson and the Vikings beat him to it five centuries earlier. While many schoolchildren learn about the Niña, the Pinta and the Santa Maria, less appealing details of Columbus’ journeys include the enslavement of Native Americans and the spread of deadly diseases.

The indigenous societies of the Americas “were decimated by exposure to Old World diseases, crumbling under the weight of epidemic,” historian David M. Perry wrote.

“Columbus didn’t know that his voyage would spread diseases across the continents, of course, but disease wasn’t the only problem. … He also took slaves for display back home and to work in his conquered lands.”

But there’s no doubt that Columbus’ voyages “had an undeniable historical impact, sparking the great age of Atlantic exploration, trade and eventually colonization by Europeans,” Perry wrote.

Source: https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/local/2020/06/15/detroit-mayor-orders-removal-of-christopher-columbus-bust/

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Last Call for malls? Reopened, but fight for relevance continues

Candice Williams and Breana Noble, The Detroit News Published 11:01 p.m. ET June 8, 2020 | Updated 10:10 a.m. ET June 9, 2020CONNECTTWEETLINKEDINCOMMENTEMAILMORE

Troy — Dozens of shoppers like Carrie Adkins ventured from their homes last week to walk the halls of Somerset Collection during its first days open after the novel coronavirus outbreak.

“It’s just nice to get out, to walk around, to get out from being closed up,” said Adkins, 48, who with her 19-year-old daughter Kristin had purchased some clothing from Forever 21 on Thursday when the mall reopened with less than a third of its 170 stores welcoming customers.Shoppers social distance as they wait to enter Forever 21 at Somerset Collection as it reopened Thursday morning.

Shoppers social distance as they wait to enter Forever 21 at Somerset Collection as it reopened Thursday morning. (Photo: Todd McInturf, The Detroit News)

Retailers report seeing a burst of initial activity. But many are uncertain over what high levels of unemployment, a recession and the lasting implications of customers turning to online shopping during the shutdown could mean for their business. And for malls already facing challenges in attracting business, COVID-19 presents another difficulty in providing shoppers comfort concerning health and safety.

“Malls have got this two-fold fight to regain relevance and bring traffic back,” said David Zietsma, head of strategy at Jackman Reinvents, a Toronto-based brand strategy firm. “Even if they solve this initial issue, there’s a much bigger challenge on the horizon.”https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

Stores already are responding. After filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in recent weeks, J.C. Penney is closing 154 stores, and discount retailer Tuesday Morning is shuttering 230 locations. Native Detroit brand Sanders Candy last week said it was pulling out of Livonia’s Laurel Park Place and Novi’s Twelve Oaks Mall in addition to closing two other standalone locations in Metro Detroit.

“The stores that we are closing are where foot traffic had been decreasing anyway,” said Bill Elam, Sanders president. “We’ve seen online sales jump, and we know those locations are just going to have a tough time recovering. COVID-19 really taught people who didn’t buy online to buy online. Shoppers of brick-and-mortar retail already were turning that way, and this has taken it to the next level.”

But some shoppers like Nahson Kellum, 20, of Southfield say they missed the in-person experience while stores closed.

“It’s more important with larger purchases,” said Kellum, who picked up a crossbody bag, some earbuds and a gift from Somerset. “Usually you want to be in a store to get a feel for the material, whatever it is.”Shopper Nahson Kellum, left, of Southfield, puts on a face mask that is offered by mall concierge Eddie Cooper as he enter the Somerset Collection.Buy Photo

Shopper Nahson Kellum, left, of Southfield, puts on a face mask that is offered by mall concierge Eddie Cooper as he enter the Somerset Collection. (Photo: Todd McInturf, The Detroit News)

Besides Sanders, Laurel Park Place has not lost any other tenants, said Stacey Keating, the mall’s spokeswoman. A few stores in the shopping center reopened last month by appointment only, according to Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s executive order. She further lifted restrictions on Thursday when stores were able to open with limits on capacity.

“We have a handful of retailers that have reopened, and I anticipate additional retailers will reopen over the coming days,” Keating said. “I think what we’ve seen when we’ve reopened our properties in other markets is that people do want to come out to the mall to shop. Retailers and our management have been happy with the sales we have seen.”https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

While Twelve Oaks may lose a couple of small tenants during these difficult times, said Daniel Jones, the mall’s manager, the shopping center had seen the number of stores open double over the course of its first week after starting with 25 stores. Many national fashion retailers — including Macy’s, Nordstrom and H&M — remained closed, but Jones expects to see more activity from the anchors this week. Sixty reserved parking spots give businesses the opportunity to offer curbside pickup, too.

“That’s been the biggest challenge,” Jones said. “Many customers expected when we opened, all the stores would be open. Each has their own philosophy. Some retailers are opening one state at a time by those least affected. Others want to open all at once.”

Customers can find a directory of open stores on most malls’ websites. But how stores open differed, as well. Some at Twelve Oaks such as Pottery Barn and Sleep Number posted signs requesting customers still call for an appointment. Others like Foot Locker posted occupancy limits and had a short line of customers on Friday.

Twelve Oaks also licensed a queue app that would allow stores to text customers their place in line to give them more flexibility when waiting to enter a store. Said Jones: “We think it will help, especially since occupancy limits will probably be in effect for a while, even after the government lifts them.”

And some stores like women’s retailer J.Jill advertised 50% off “welcome back” sales.

“I like to see what I buy,” said Liz O’Donohue, 23, of Canton Township who scored three winter apparel items on sale from Dry Goods for just $28 altogether. “I needed to get out of the house.”

Dearborn’s Fairlane Town Center will reopen at 11 a.m. on Wednesday. In Taylor’s Southland Center, six businesses were open and a few more offered curbside pickup, according to its website. The outdoor Mall at Partridge Creek had about a dozen businesses open or offering appointments and several more offering curbside or carry-out service.Miranda Gonyeau, left, and friend, Emily Kochan, both of Algonac, walk across the atrium floor at the Somerset Collection as it reopened Thursday.Buy Photo

Miranda Gonyeau, left, and friend, Emily Kochan, both of Algonac, walk across the atrium floor at the Somerset Collection as it reopened Thursday. (Photo: Todd McInturf, The Detroit News)

Many malls online also shared steps they had taken in response to the virus outbreak. Play areas were closed. They removed seating from common areas and food courts. Food trays were eliminated. Floor stickers reminded customers to keep six feet apart at Twelve Oaks.

Many retailers are recommending, if not requiring, customers wear masks. That can put businesses in a prickly situation, said Meegan Holland, spokeswoman for the Michigan Retailers Association. The organization is holding a webinar this week on de-escalation techniques for such situations.https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

“We feel we need to do it because there are retailers who are concerned about this, who need those shopping dollars,” Holland said. “It is really hard for a retailer to be put into an enforcement role, especially when there are no criminal penalties to back them up. You don’t want to endanger employees in confronting customers. We all know you aren’t paying them enough to do that.”For shoppers' safety, drinking fountains are not in use, although, rest rooms are open at Somerset Collection.Buy Photo

For shoppers’ safety, drinking fountains are not in use, although, rest rooms are open at Somerset Collection. (Photo: Todd McInturf, The Detroit News)

At Somerset, hand sanitizer stations appeared throughout the mall, and white gift bags containing complimentary face masks were available from the concierge staff. Some stores had social distancing markers on the floor outside their entrances. The mall also was offering free bottles of water in lieu of drinking fountains.

At the Louis Vuitton store on the south side of the mall, customers had to check in prior to joining the line to enter. Employees asked them while they waited if they were looking for particular items so they could verify they were in stock.

Tapper’s Diamonds and Fine Jewelry previously did curbside pickup and allowed guests to shop by appointment only. It was able to accommodate customers with special orders made prior to the shutdown, said Paul Rujuan, the store’s director, but Thursday was like opening day for baseball season.

“I think there’s a lot of pent-up demand,” Rujan said, adding that employees wipe down the store hourly. And they clean the jewelry after customers try it on.

“When we’re dealing with clients, we wear gloves,” he said. “Anything we can do to make it a better environment for somebody coming in and protect ourselves.”

Kristin Adkins, left, and her mother, Carrie, both of Joliet, Ill. shop, Thursday at the Somerset Collection as their father and husband, respectively, temporarily works in the Detroit-Metro area. (Photo: Todd McInturf, The Detroit News)

Adkins, who was out shopping with her daughter, appreciates the safety measures and hopes some of them like hand sanitizing stations stay.

“I think it should have been there all along anyway,” she said “In general, colds, flus — we should have had this before.”

cwilliams@detroitnews.com

bnoble@detroitnews.com

Source: https://www.detroitnews.com/story/business/2020/06/09/reopening-detroit-area-malls-fight-relevance/3138132001/

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Canadian Smuggles weed across Detroit river in small submarine

By Lee DeVito@leedevito

A Canadian man is facing charges after admitting to authorities that he used a small submarine to smuggle drugs across the Detroit River.

Glen Richard Mousseau was pulled over in May while driving a U-Haul in Michigan, when authorities found a package containing more than $97,000 in the trunk. At the time, Mousseau claimed he did not know who the package belonged to, but later admitted that he directs a smuggling organization that moves money and drugs by giving “GPS coordinates to someone in Canada, and that person crosses the river in a submarine,” according to WDIV.

Border patrol authorities had seized a small submarine on Zug Island in April, which Mousseau admitted belonged to him. (The Detroit News reported the vehicle was a Seabob-Jet, which is more like an underwater jet ski.)

Mousseau was allowed to stay in a Flat Rock hotel while the investigation was underway, but escaped. On May 22, border patrol approached a vessel on the Detroit River, when they noticed packages being thrown into the river. Mousseau was found unconscious tied to the bundles, which contained about 265 pounds of marijuana.

In April, a Canadian nurse was pulled over at the border while attempting to smuggle 150 lbs. of weed. At the time, she said she was crossing the border to treat COVID-19 patients. The border was closed to non-essential travel.

Both Canada and Michigan have legal, recreational weed.

A Canadian man is facing charges after admitting to authorities that he used a small submarine to smuggle drugs across the Detroit River.

Glen Richard Mousseau was pulled over in May while driving a U-Haul in Michigan, when authorities found a package containing more than $97,000 in the trunk. At the time, Mousseau claimed he did not know who the package belonged to, but later admitted that he directs a smuggling organization that moves money and drugs by giving “GPS coordinates to someone in Canada, and that person crosses the river in a submarine,” according to WDIV.

Border patrol authorities had seized a small submarine on Zug Island in April, which Mousseau admitted belonged to him. (The Detroit News reported the vehicle was a Seabob-Jet, which is more like an underwater jet ski.)

Mousseau was allowed to stay in a Flat Rock hotel while the investigation was underway, but escaped. On May 22, border patrol approached a vessel on the Detroit River, when they noticed packages being thrown into the river. Mousseau was found unconscious tied to the bundles, which contained about 265 pounds of marijuana.

In April, a Canadian nurse was pulled over at the border while attempting to smuggle 150 lbs. of weed. At the time, she said she was crossing the border to treat COVID-19 patients. The border was closed to non-essential travel.

Both Canada and Michigan have legal, recreational weed.

Source: https://www.metrotimes.com/detroit/a-canadian-smuggled-weed-across-the-detroit-river-in-a-small-submarine/Content?oid=24739699

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City of Detroit removes Christopher Columbus statue from downtown as black lives matter protests continue

Posted By Steve Neavling on Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 1:04 PM

  • Steve Neavling
  • Protesters draped a black cloth over the Christopher Columbus statue in downtown Detroit in August 2017.

The City of Detroit removed its 110-year-old Christopher Columbus statue on Monday.

Mayor Mike Duggan ordered the removal of the statue, which has been standing at Jefferson Avenue and Randolph downtown since the late 1980s.

https://lockerdome.com/lad/9215244082070374?pubid=ld-dfp-ad-9215244082070374-0&pubo=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.metrotimes.com&rid=www.newsbreak.com&width=550

“The mayor decided it ought to be placed in storage to give us time to reevaluate the appropriate long-term disposition of the statue,” mayoral spokesman John Roach tells Metro Times.

In recent weeks, protesters nationwide have torn down, destroyed, and defaced statues memorializing racists amid the Black Lives Matter protests in the wake of the death of George Floyd.

The statue was dedicated to the city of Detroit on Oct. 12, 1910, and originally sat at the north end of Washington Boulevard at Grand Circus Park.

A local activist group called for the statue to be removed in August 2017, saying Columbus represents violence and genocide, and his statue symbolizes mass slaughter.

Columbus advocated fighting and enslaving native groups because he perceived them as cannibals. Those who weren’t killed often were forced to mine gold under brutal conditions. Columbus and his crew also sold nearly 1,500 enslaved islanders to Europe.

Last week, a cardboard sign was placed on the bust, reading, “Looter. Rapist. Slave Trader.”

On Columbus Day in 2015, someone vandalized Detroit’s Columbus statue, making it look like a bloody hatchet blow to the statue’s head.

Earlier this month, a statue of former Dearborn Mayor Orville Hubbard, a staunch segregationist, was put into storage after someone put a Black Lives Matter T-shirt on it.

In recent years, Duggan called for Cobo Center to be renamed because it was named after former Mayor Albert Cobo, a racist who ran on a platform of “Negro removal.” It’s now called TCF Center.

Source: https://www.metrotimes.com/news-hits/archives/2020/06/15/city-of-detroit-removes-christopher-columbus-statue-from-downtown-as-black-lives-matter-protests-continue