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COVID – 19 can start with neurological symptoms

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, June 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) — While a fever and cough have seemed to be the early warning signs of COVID-19, new research shows almost half of hospitalized patients experience a host of neurological problems.

In fact, headaches, dizziness, strokes, weakness, decreased alertness or other neurological symptoms can appear before the more commonly known symptoms of infection with the new coronavirus (known as SARS-COV-2), the researchers said.

Those neurological symptoms can also include loss of smell and taste, seizures, muscle pain and difficulty concentrating.

“It’s important for the general public and physicians to be aware of this, because a SARS-COV-2 infection may present with neurologic symptoms initially, before any fever, cough or respiratory problems occur,” said researcher Dr. Igor Koralnik. He is chief of neuro-infectious diseases and global neurology, and a professor of neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago. ADVERTISEMENT

For the study, Koralnik’s team looked at all COVID-19 patients hospitalized at Northwestern Medicine, to see how often neurological complications appeared and how they responded to treatment.

“This understanding is key to direct appropriate clinical management and treatment,” Koralnik said in a Northwestern news release.

The virus can affect the whole nervous system — the brain, spinal cord, nerves and muscles. COVID-19 can also affect the lungs, kidneys, heart and brain, he said.

Last, but not least, the virus can infect the brain. Moreover, the reaction of the immune system to the infection can cause inflammation that can damage the brain and nerves, Koralnik added.

Because little is known about the long-term effects of the virus, the researchers intend to follow patients with neurological problems, to see how they do over time.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20200615/covid-19-can-start-with-neurological-symptoms

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I’ve signed death certificates during Covid-19. Here’s why you can’t trust any of the statistics on the number of victims

Unless we have accurate data, we won’t know which has killed more: the disease or the lockdown?

RT – May 29, 2020 26 Comments

Image Credits: Screenshot.

By Malcolm Kendrick, doctor and author who works as a GP in the National Health Service in England. His blog can be read here and his book, ‘Doctoring Data – How to Sort Out Medical Advice from Medical Nonsense,’ is available here.

As an NHS doctor, I’ve seen people die and be listed as a victim of coronavirus without ever being tested for it. But unless we have accurate data, we won’t know which has killed more: the disease or the lockdown?

I suppose most people would be somewhat surprised to know that the cause of death, as written on death certificates, is often little more than an educated guess.

Most people die when they are old, often over eighty.

There is very rarely going to be a post-mortem carried out, which means that, as a doctor, you have a think about the patient’s symptoms in the last two weeks of life or so.

You go back over the notes to look for existing medical conditions. https://api.banned.video/embed/5ed011e5ef3949002fb7e5c4

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Previous stroke, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, angina, dementia and suchlike. Then you talk to the relatives and carers and try to find out what they saw. Did they struggle for breath, were they gradually going downhill, not eating or drinking?

If I saw them in the last two weeks of life, what do I think was the most likely cause of death? There are, of course, other factors. Did they fall, did they break a leg and have an operation – in which case a post-mortem would more likely be carried out to find out if the operation was a cause.

Mostly, however, out in the community, death certification is certainly not an exact science. Never was, never will be. It’s true that things are somewhat more accurate in hospitals, where there are more tests and scans, and suchlike.

Then, along comes Covid-19, and many of the rules – such as they were – went straight out the window. At one point, it was even suggested that relatives could fill in death certificates, if no-one else was available. Though I am not sure this ever happened.

What were we now supposed to do? If an elderly person died in a care home, or at home, did they die of Covid-19? Well, frankly, who knows? Especially if they didn’t have a test for Covid-19 – which for several weeks was not even allowed. Only patients entering hospital were deemed worthy of a test. No-one else.

What advice was given? It varied throughout the country, and from coroner to coroner – and from day to day. Was every person in a care home now to be diagnosed as dying of the coronavirus ? Well, that was certainly the advice given in several parts of the UK.

Where I work, things were left more open. I discussed things with colleagues and there was very little consensus. I put Covid-19 on a couple of certificates, and not on a couple of others. Based on how the person seemed to die.

I do know that other doctors put down Covid-19 on anyone who died from early March onwards. I didn’t. What can be made of the statistics created from data like these? And does it matter?

It matters greatly for two main reasons. First, if we vastly overestimate deaths from Covid-19, we will greatly underestimate the harm caused by the lockdown. This issue was looked at in a recent article published in the BMJ, The British Medical Journal.  It stated: “Only a third of the excess deaths seen in the community in England and Wales can be explained by Covid-19.

…David Spiegelhalter, chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication at the University of Cambridge, said that Covid-19 did not explain the high number of deaths taking place in the community.”

“At a briefing hosted by the Science Media Centre on May 12 he explained that, over the past five weeks, care homes and other community settings had had to deal with a ‘staggering burden’ of 30,000 more deaths than would normally be expected, as patients were moved out of hospitals that were anticipating high demand for beds.

Of those 30,000, only 10 000 have had Covid-19 specified on the death certificate. While Spiegelhalter acknowledged that some of these ‘excess deaths’ might be the result of underdiagnosis, ‘the huge number of unexplained extra deaths in homes and care homes is extraordinary. When we look back . . . this rise in non-covid extra deaths outside the hospital is something I hope will be given really severe attention.’ He added that many of these deaths would be among people ‘who may well have lived longer if they had managed to get to hospital.’”

What Speigelhalter is saying here is that people may well be dying ‘because of’ Covid, or rather, because of the lockdown. Because they are not going to hospital to be treated for conditions other than Covid. We know that A&E attendances have fallen by over fifty percent since lockdown. Admissions with chest pain have dropped by over fifty percent. Did these people just die at home?

From my own perspective, I have certainly found it extremely difficult to get elderly patients admitted to hospital. I recently managed with one old chap who was found to have sepsis, not Covid-19. Had he died in the care home; he would almost certainly have been diagnosed as “dying of Covid.”

The bottom line here is that, if we do not diagnose deaths accurately, we will never know how many died of Covid-19, or ‘because of’ the lockdown. Those supporting lockdown, and advising governments, can point to how deadly Covid was, and say we were right to do what we did. When it may have been that lockdown itself was just as deadly. Directing care away from everything else, to deal with a single condition. Keeping sick, ill, vulnerable people away from hospitals.

The other reason why having accurate statistics is vitally important is in planning for the future. We have to accurately know what happened this time, in order to plan for the next pandemic, which seems almost inevitable as the world grows more crowded. What are the benefits of lockdown, what are the harms? What should we do next time a deadly virus strikes?

If Covid-19 killed 30,000, and lockdown killed the other 30,000, then the lockdown was a complete and utter waste of time. and should never happen again. The great fear is that this would be a message this government does not want to hear – so they will do everything possible not to hear it.

It will be decreed that all the excess deaths we have seen this year were due to Covid-19. That escape route will be made far easier if no-one has any real idea who actually died of the coronavirus disease, and who did not. Yes, the data on Covid-19 deaths really matters.

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Scientists believe cannabis could help prevent, treat coronavirus

They have high hopes for a coronavirus breakthrough.

A team of Canadian scientists believes it has found strong strains of cannabis that could help prevent or treat coronavirus infections, according to interviews and a study.

Researchers from the University of Lethbridge said a study in April showed at least 13 cannabis plants were high in CBD that appeared to affect the ACE2 pathways that the bug uses to access the body.

“We were totally stunned at first, and then we were really happy,” one of the researchers, Olga Kovalchuk, told CTV News.

The results, printed in online journal Preprints, indicated hemp extracts high in CBD may help block proteins that provide a “gateway” for COVID-19 to enter host

Kovalchuk’s husband, Igor, suggested cannabis could reduce the virus’ entry points by up to 70 percent. “Therefore, you have more chance to fight it,” he told CTV.

“Our work could have a huge influence — there aren’t many drugs that have the potential of reducing infection by 70 to 80 percent,” he told the Calgary Herald.

While they stressed that more research was needed, the study gave hope that the cannabis, if proven to modulate the enzyme, “may prove a plausible strategy for decreasing disease susceptibility” as well as “become a useful and safe addition to the treatment of COVID-19 as an adjunct therapy.”

Cannabis could even be used to “develop easy-to-use preventative treatments in the form of mouthwash and throat gargle products,” the study suggested, with a “potential to decrease viral entry” through the mouth.

“The key thing is not that any cannabis you would pick up at the store will do the trick,” Olga told CTV, with the study suggesting just a handful of more than 800 varieties of sativa seemed to help.

All were high in anti-inflammatory CBD — but low in THC, the part that produces the cannabis high.

The study, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, was carried out in partnership with Pathway Rx, a cannabis therapy research company, and Swysh Inc., a cannabinoid-based research company.

The researchers are seeking funding to continue their efforts to support scientific initiatives to address COVID-19.

“While our most effective extracts require further large-scale validation, our study is crucial for the future analysis of the effects of medical cannabis on COVID-19,” the research said.

“Given the current dire and rapidly evolving epidemiological situation, every possible therapeutic opportunity and avenue must be considered.”FILED UNDER 

CANNABIS ,  CORONAVIRUS ,  STUDY SAYS ,  5/21/20

https://nypost.com/2020/05/21/scientists-believe-cannabis-could-help-prevent-treat-coronavirus/

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See-through coronavirus face masks let hearing-impaired physical therapist keep working

Masking requirements create new challenges for hearing-impaired individuals

As researchers push for the widespread use of face coverings to combat coronavirus, one health professional came up with a creative way to help her hearing-impaired employee, who relies on lip-reading to communicate.

At Mission Hospital in south Orange County, California, hearing-impaired physical therapist Susan Adams said she became concerned that masking requirements might put her out of a job if she could no longer read lips.

However, her supervisor, Michelle Darrow, started sewing protective equipment with a clear panel over the mouth area that would allow Adams to see her co-workers’ lip movements, The OC Register reported.

“I had a profound sense of gratitude because without Michelle advocating for me, I wouldn’t be working,” Adams, told the paper.

“It means so much to be able to work.”

 

Darrow has made more than 120 custom masks with help from donors, according to a local news outlet, with the masks being distributed to patients and colleagues.

As Fox News previously reported, researchers have said lockdown measures were insufficient to prevent the further spread of the virus – and were advocating for the “universal adoption of facemasks by the public” as a way to safely reopen countries before a vaccine becomes available.

 

Those recommendations came as some states were combating a spike in coronavirus cases, including Texas, South Carolina and Oregon.

The U.S. surpassed 2 million confirmed cases this week.

 

Source: https://www.foxnews.com/health/coronavirus-face-mask-hearing-impaired-employee

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Detroit newspaper: Data showing Michigan coronavirus spike ‘misleading’

As the country continues to reopen, various media outlets have been quick to point out a spike in coronavirus cases for the state of Michigan. The Detroit Free Press, however, begged to differ and published a breakdown of the numbers on Thursday, describing how they could be misleading.

The Free Press cited reports by SmartNewsNewsweek, and NPR that all addressed the state’s rising COVID count. The newspaper’s verdict to the question of whether or not it was a true spike was “yes and no.”

Michigan reportedly released new data that included probable cases along with confirmed infections and fatalities.

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The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services labels a confirmed case as someone who has had a positive lab test for coronavirus. A “probable case” applies to anyone who has been symptomatic and has a link to a patient with a confirmed infection.

The Free Press claimed that news websites reporting on these numbers have failed to denote the two different categories and have simply combined the two figures.

As of Thursday evening, Johns Hopkins University’s COVID-19 tracker showed that Michigan had almost 65,000 cases, but it too factors probable cases into their totals.

“When states have data on probable cases and deaths, the dashboard includes those in [their] totals,” a Johns Hopkins University spokesperson told The Free Press. “Confirmed cases include presumptive positive cases and probable cases, in accordance with CDC guidelines as of April 14.”

Nick Givas is a reporter with Fox News. You can find him on Twitter at @NGivasDC.

Source: https://www.foxnews.com/health/detroit-newspaper-data-showing-michigan-coronavirus-spike-misleading